Hormone Replacement Therapy in Delray Beach

Are you one of the many people in Delray Beach who are burning the candle at both ends and maybe only getting 4 or 5 hours of sleep a night? Are you also one of those guys having problems with his sex drive and feeling out of sorts? Well, recent studies done in Delray Beach in the last 3 years show that these symptoms could all be due to the effect of sleep on testosterone Рjust how, though, may be a chicken and egg question!

While it’s true that lower testosterone levels can be the cause of a sluggish sex drive and irritability it seems to be a matter of research opinion whether low sleep levels cause low testosterone or low testosterone causes lack of sleep.

How to Lose Weight by Eating Fruit

bioidentical hormone replacement therapy weight loss

There's a growing interest in testosterone hormone replacement for treating symptoms related to aging. You've probably seen advertisements of virile, muscle bound men in their 60's and 70's.

Along with the growing interest there's also a growing amount of information. But much of it is anecdotal stories, misleading data and flat out, unproven myths. Especially as it relates to testosterone replacement therapy for women.

The fact is that medically administered, testosterone therapy is also used to successfully treat symptoms of hormone deficiency in pre and postmenopausal women. And two physicians-Dr. Rebecca Glaser and Dr. Constantine Dimitrakakis-are dispelling the misinformation about it through scientific research.

Dr. Glaser and Dr. Dimitrakakis focus on subcutaneously implanted, bio-identical hormones (human identical molecule) and not oral, synthetic androgens or anabolic steroids.

With that in mind, here are the 10 myths of testosterone replacement therapy for women.

Myth #1: Testosterone is a "male" hormone

Although men have a higher circulating level of testosterone than women, from a biological perspective, men and women are genetically similar. Both sexes include functional estrogen and androgen (testosterone) receptors. And while estrogen is popularly considered the primary female hormone, throughout a woman's lifespan, testosterone is actually the most abundant, biologically active hormone with significantly higher levels than estradiol. And as early as 1937, testosterone therapy was reported to effectively treat symptoms of the menopause.

Myth #2: Its only role in women is sex drive and libido

There's a lot of hype about testosterone's role in sexual function. But in reality, it's a fraction of the overall physiologic effect testosterone plays in women. That's because testosterone governs the health of almost all tissues including the breast, heart, blood vessels, gastrointestinal tract, lung, brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, bladder, uterus, ovaries, endocrine glands, vaginal tissue, skin, bone, bone marrow, synovium, muscle and adipose tissue.

The function of these tissues declines as testosterone declines. The result of this deficiency in both men and women includes dysphoric mood (anxiety, irritability, depression), lack of well-being, physical fatigue, bone loss, muscle loss, changes in cognition, memory loss, insomnia, hot flashes, rheumatoid complaints, pain, breast pain, urinary complaints, incontinence as well as sexual dysfunction. And just like for men, these symptoms are successfully treated in women through testosterone therapy.

Myth #3: It masculinizes females

Testosterone therapy has been safely and successfully administered in women for over 76 years. Rather than decrease a woman's femininity it increases it. Testosterone stimulates ovulation, increases fertility and safely treats the nausea of early pregnancy without adverse effects.

Sure, large doses of supra-pharmacological synthetic testosterone are used to treat female to male transgender patients to increase male traits like body hair. But this requires high doses over an extended period of time. Even then, true masculinization is still not possible. And these effects are reversible by simply lowering the dosage.

Myth #4: It causes hoarseness and voice changes

Hoarseness is most commonly caused by inflammation due to allergies, infectious or chemical laryngitis, reflux esophagitis, voice over-use, mucosal tears, medications and vocal cord polyps. Testosterone possesses anti-inflammatory properties. There is no evidence that testosterone causes hoarseness and there is no physiological mechanism that allows testosterone to do so.

Although a few anecdotal case reports and small questionnaire studies have reported an association between 400 and 800 mg/d of danazol and self-reported, subjective voice 'changes' an objective study demonstrated the opposite.

Twenty-four patients received 600 mg of danazol (synthetic testosterone) therapy daily and were studied for 3 and 6 months. There were no vocal changes that could be attributed to the androgenic properties of danazol. These conclusions are consistent with a one year study examining voice changes on pharmaco-logic doses of subcutaneous testosterone implant therapy in women by Glaser and Dimitrakakis.

Myth #5: It causes hair loss

Hair loss is a complicated, genetically determined process and there is no evidence that either testosterone or testosterone therapy cause it. In fact, from a medical perspective, dihy-drotestosterone (DHT), not testosterone, is considered the active androgen in male pattern balding.

There are many factors associated with hair loss. For example, it's common in both women and men with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases 5-alpha reductase, which increases conversion of testosterone to dihy-drotestosterone in the hair follicle.

In addition, obesity, age, alcohol, medications and sedentary lifestyle increase aromatase activity, which lowers testosterone and raises estradiol. Increased DHT, lowered testosterone, and elevated estradiol levels can contribute to hair loss in genetically predisposed men and women. But so can medications, stress and nutritional deficiencies.

In studies conducted by Glaser and Dimitrakakis, two thirds of women treated with subcutaneous testosterone implants have scalp hair re-growth on therapy. Women who did not re-grow hair were more likely to be hypo or hyperthyroid, iron deficient or have elevated body mass index. And none of the 285 patients treated for up to 56 months with subcutaneous T therapy complained of hair loss.

Myth #6: It has adverse effects on the heart

On the contrary, there is overwhelming biological and clinical evidence that testosterone promotes a healthy heart. Testosterone has a beneficial effect on lean body mass, glucose metabolism and lipid profiles in men and women. It is successfully used to treat and prevent cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Testosterone also widens blood vessels in both sexes, has immune-modulating properties that inhibit plaque and strengthens the cardiac muscle. It improves functional capacity, insulin resistance and muscle strength in both men and women with congestive heart failure.

Myth #7: It causes liver damage

High doses of oral, synthetic androgens (e.g., methyl-testosterone) pass through the digestive system, are absorbed into the entero-hepatic circulation and can adversely affect the liver. But subcutaneous implants and topical patches avoid the entero-hepatic circulation and bypass the liver. So there is no adverse effect on the liver, liver enzymes or clotting factors.

Furthermore, non-oral testosterone does not increase the risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism like oral estrogens, androgens and synthetic progestins. And despite the concern over liver toxicities with anabolic steroids and oral synthetic androgens, there are only 3 reports of hepa-tocellular carcinoma in men treated with high doses of oral synthetic methyl testosterone. Even the report of benign tumors (adenomas) with oral androgen therapy is exceedingly rare.

Myth #8: It causes aggression

Although anabolic steroids can increase aggression and rage, this does not occur with testosterone therapy. Even supra-pharmacologic doses of intramuscular testosterone undecanoate do not increase aggressive behavior. But as stated before, testosterone can aromatize to estradiol. And there is considerable evidence among species, that estrogens, not testosterone, play a major role in aggression and hostility.

However, in studies conducted by Glaser and Dimitrakakis, over 90% of women treated with subcutaneous testosterone therapy have documented decreased aggression, irritability and anxiety. And this is not a new finding. Androgen therapy has been used to treat PMS for over 60 years.

Myth #9: It may increase the risk of breast cancer

It was recognized as early as 1937 that breast cancer was an estrogen sensitive cancer and that testosterone acted as a counter balance to estrogen. Clinical trials in primates and humans have confirmed that testosterone has a beneficial effect on breast tissue by decreasing breast proliferation and preventing stimulation from estradiol.

However, some epidemiological studies have reported an association between elevated androgens and breast cancer. But these studies suffer from methodological limitations, and more importantly, do not account for associated elevated estradiol levels and increased body mass index. And the cause and effect interpretation of these studies conflicts with the known biological effect of testosterone.

Although testosterone is breast protective, it can aromatize to estradiol and have a secondary, stimulatory effect on the estrogen receptor. But when testosterone is combined with an aromatase inhibitor in a subcutaneous implant, it blocks testosterone from aromatizing.

This form of treatment has been shown to effectively treat androgen deficiency symptoms in breast cancer survivors and is currently being evaluated in a U.S. national cancer study. In addition, Dimitrakakis and Glaser see a reduced incidence of breast cancer in women treated with testosterone or testosterone with anastrozole implants.

Myth #10: The safety of testosterone use in women has not been established

Testosterone implants have been used safely in women since 1938. Any real concerns would be well established by now.

Long-term data exists on the successful and safe use of testosterone in doses of up to 225 mg in up to 40 years of therapy. In addition, long term follow up studies on supra-pharmacologic doses used to 'female to male' transgender patients report no increase in mortality, breast cancer, vascular disease or other major health problems.

Many of the side effects and safety concerns attributed to testosterone are from oral formulations, or are secondary to increased aromatase activity due to elevated estradiol. This effect increases with age, obesity, alcohol intake, insulin resistance, breast cancer, medications, drugs, processed diet and sedentary lifestyle. Although often overlooked or not addressed in clinical studies, monitoring aromatase activity and symptoms of elevated estradiol is critical to the safe use of testosterone in both sexes.

Adequate testosterone is essential for physical, mental and emotional health in both sexes. Abandoning myths, misconceptions and unfounded concerns about testosterone and testosterone therapy in women allows physicians to provide evidence based recommendations and appropriate therapy

How to Raise Your Testosterone Levels With Testosterone Cream

hormone replacement therapy clinics

When a woman reaches the approximate age of 50, she has to be concerned about the onset of menopause. Menopause occurs when the body starts reducing the amount of estrogen it produces, and it can lead to a series of potential risks, like increased odds of breast cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular risks. To offset these risks, women have taken hormonal supplements to offset the newly created imbalance in their bodies. But only recently has it emerged that a popular hormone therapy of the past doesn't altogether protect against all potential risks. Women were confused, and clarification and updates were in order. Making these issues clear can never be done enough, and it is with that in mind that we look at various ways of treating menopause.

The cure of the past used estrogen isolated from a pregnant mare, and this is what was determined not to be less than effective in some cases, and possibly detrimental in others. There is logic in this, as it's the body's hormonal changes that cause menopause, not a lack of horse estrogen. Accordingly, it's not progesterone's chemical analogues that were needed, but human bio-identical progesterone.

There are various hormones that studies have shown to be effective ways of reducing the effects of menopause. Included in this list are: estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, and DHEA. Among the positive effects of these supplements are: lower cholesterol levels, increased bone density, reduced frequency of night sweats and warm flashes, diminishment of menstrual-type syndromes, and promotion of an overall feeling of well-being.

If you are in the stage where it's necessary to seek treatment, either if you think you're on the verge of entering menopause or you'd like to treat it differently, it's essential that you speak to a trusted pharmacist and read up on the latest articles and studies. Living right, watching what you eat, and getting a fair amount of exercise can help you keep a healthy body, but when it comes to redressing the hormonal imbalance you need a different type of solution. This can only be addressed by changing your hormone intake, and to learn how to properly do this you need to consult an expert. Talk to other women experiencing the same conditions, and feel empowered to seek the best treatment for you. It's of paramount concern to your overall health, and once dealt with properly, you'll feel much better in your day to day life.

When seeking treatment for menopause, it's essential to find the best, most trusted pharmacy around. Professionals all have a way of describing the conditions and the treatment in a convincing fashion, so it's nearly impossible to discern who is effective and who isn't simply by hearing them speak. For this, you need to base your decision on their experience and success rate. It's an important decision, so take your time and make a deliberate choice. It's a time where your body undergoes considerable change, but it can be a smooth transition with the right treatment.

How Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy Is Used To Treat Menopause

alternatives to hormone replacement therapy

The good news for men that suffer from low testosterone levels is that there are treatment methods available to help them get their levels back up to normal as well as get rid of the symptoms that are associated with this condition. Testosterone replacement therapy is one of the first methods of treatment that doctors choose for their patients. This type of treatment is created for the purpose of introducing more testosterone into the body, which will raise the levels. Men can receive this replacement therapy through injections, having pellets implanted underneath the skin, by applying a topical gel or taking a pill.

While these methods have both advantages and disadvantages, there is a newer product on the market that is quickly becoming popular. Similar to gel, testosterone cream is an effective form of treatment for raising testosterone levels in a way that is convenient and easy to use. Many men favor testosterone cream over the patch or gel because there is less chance of skin irritation. In order to use this product, all you have to do is apply a generous amount to your stomach, upper arms, thighs and shoulders once a day for up to eight weeks in order to maintain normal levels of testosterone.

It is important to note that there are side effects that come with using the cream that include problems with indigestion, headache or dizziness and high blood pressure in relation to fluid retention. Because this product can cause prostate problems, men that are currently suffering from issues with their prostate will not be able to use this cream.

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Delray Beach, Florida

Delray Beach is a coastal city in Palm Beach County, Florida, United States. The population of Delray Beach was estimated at 67,371 in 2016. That is up from 60,522 according to the 2010 United States Census.[8] Delray Beach is a principal city of the Miami metropolitan area, which was home to an estimated 6,012,331 people in 2015.

The earliest known human inhabitants of what is now Delray Beach were the Jaega people.[11]Tequesta Indians likely passed through or inhabited the area at various times, and an 1841 U.S. military map shows a Seminole camp located in the area now known as Lake Ida. Few other recorded details of these local indigenous settlements have survived.[12][13]

In 1876, the United States Life Saving Service built the Orange Grove House of Refuge to rescue and shelter ship-wrecked sailors. The house derived its name from the grove of mature sour orange and other tropical fruit trees found at the site chosen for the house of refuge, but no record or evidence of who planted the trees was discovered.[1][2]


Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Palm Beach